Use Pinterest to Find Public Domain Images to Rock Your Glogs

Finding websites that have public domain images to use in your Glogs can be a time-consuming task. Searching for hours on Google or other search engines for websites that have images that are public domain and royalty free can be daunting. I have found that a quicker way to find public domain images is through searching Pinterest.

Searching “public domain” in the search window on Pinterest allows you to quickly find images that have been categorized or tagged as such.  While this will lead you to images that have been listed as public domain, doing so doesn’t assure that the images are definitely public domain. You need to click on the image and be redirected to the original website to double-check that the image is actually a public domain image (as well as to be able to save the image to your computer.)

Searching public domain images on Pinterest can save hours of time because many of the images have already been categorized or tagged as public domain.  Therefore, the accuracy of finding a website that has public domain images is much higher than searching images through search engines.  Once you have found one website that has a public domain image, there is a higher likelihood that the website has other public domain images as well, which can be used on your Glogs.

Here’s how to search Pinterest for public domain images, how to save the images, and how to upload them to your Glog.

First- Log-in to Pinterest.

Second- In the search window type in “public domain”.

Third- Scroll through the images and find the image that you would like to use as your Glog wall.

Fourth- Click one time on the image you would like to use.

Fifth- Click on the large image to be redirected to the original source of the public domain image. 

Sixth-  Check the original source to make sure the image is definitely public domain.

Seventh- Review the instructions to download and “save” the image to your computer.  

Eighth-  Once you are on the original public domain image, right click and “save image as”.

Ninth- Chose the location you would like to save the image to.

Tenth- Go to your Glog and click on “Wall”.  Next click on “Glog Wall”.  Then click “Upload”.

Eleventh- Find the image you would like to upload and double-click on it.

Twelfth- Click on the setting for how you would like to use the image as your Glog Wall.  Then click “Use It”. 

Thirteeth- Make sure you chose the correct option you wanted for how to display the image as your Glog Wall.

Fourteenth- Next set the image for your Page Wall.  You can use a public domain image or use one of the images that Glogster EDU provides.

Fifteenth- Use Pinterest to find other images to place inside your Glog.  Follow the same search instructions as listed above.

Sixteenth- Click to the original source to make sure it is definitely public domain.  Save it and upload it to your Glog using “Images” on Glogster EDU.

Seventeenth- Finish your Glog and voilà.   

Glog by Beth Crumpler

Using Glogster EDU to make the flip

Much has been said (and debated) about the “flipped classroom,”  a pedagogical model in which the traditional classroom structure — lecture in class, homework at home — is “flipped.” Students watch or listen to prerecorded material at home, and engage in collaborative exercises, discussions, and projects  in class. (If you’re not familiar with the idea, this is a good overview.) 

The concept is simple, but in practice, an effective flipped model requires a great deal of preparation upfront. Fortunately, with Khan Academy quickly becoming a household name and the launch of Youtube for Schools, teachers now have access to tens of thousands of quality recordings to help them “make the flip” without necessarily creating all of the instructional material themselves. The question then becomes one of delivery — how to make those resources easily accessible to students and motivating enough so that students actually do the necessary preparations at home.

We hope that Glogster EDU provides you with the answer. It’s quick and easy  to embed instructional videos in a Glog, which students can view from home or wherever they have internet access. The creative format is completely customizable and visually engaging for students. You can embed a podcast in your Glog, link to online resources, or use the data attachment tool (with Glogster EDU Premium) to attach a short quiz to check for comprehension. Students can leave their questions in the Glog comments, so you know exactly what to focus on in class the next day.

There are pros and cons to the flipped classroom, of course (as with any learning model, once size never fits all), but the basic philosophy is one I think we can all get behind: students taking control of their own learning. When class time is reserved for active learning rather than passive note-taking, students get the opportunity to collaborate with their peers and engage with the material in a hands-on way that will lead to authentic, meaningful learning.

Or that’s the goal, anyway. This is where you come into the discussion! Glogster EDUcators, we want to hear from you. Are you a proponent of the flipped model? How do you put it into practice? Do you use Glogster EDU to make the flip, and if so, how?

We’ve asked a few of our Glogster EDU Ambassadors these questions, and next week I’ll be sharing their stories, resources, and sample Glogs. I’d love to include your stories, too — feel free to leave your thoughts in the comments.

Stay tuned!

Image from David Truss’s “3 Keys to a Flipped Classroom.”