Have you met Maybelle?

Thanks to everyone who joined us for yesterday’s Webinar on Mary Carole Strother’s ISTE award winning project, “Maybelle the Cockroach!” If you couldn’t make it to the live presentation, you can view a recording here.

Maybelle has travelled the country getting students excited to read and learn. Have you met Maybelle? Take a look at her adventures here:

Maybelle the Cockroach: http://maybellethecockroach.wikispaces.com/

The Maybelle Literacy and Multimedia Festival: https://maybelledigitalfestival.wikispaces.com/home

Want Maybelle to come to your school? Click on the Glog above for Mary Carole’s contact info.

Our next Webinar on is next Thursday, April 19 at 4 pm. Instructional Technology Specialist Andrea Gardner will discuss how to use Glogster EDU to address Common Core State Standards. Learn more and register here.

Hope to see you next week!

April Webinars

This month, our Webinars will be hosted by our very own Glogster EDU Ambassadors. As always, registration is free and open to all, but attendance is limited to the first 100 attendees. So show up early to secure your spot!

1. Using Glogster EDU for Project-Based Learning on Wednesday, April 4 at 3 pm EDT

Register here

Glogster EDU + PBL = A++! Project-based learning is more than just “doing projects.” Glogster EDU makes effective PBL easy. Help your students develop inquiry, research, time management, communication, presentation, leadership, and reflection skills on a fun and engaging platform.

Mike from the Glogster EDU Team will show you how to start a Glog project, create a template, assign it to the class, monitor progress, and provide feedback with Glogster EDU Premium. He’ll also provide you with plenty of example Glogs and lesson plans to get you started.

2. ISTE Technology Innovation Award winning project,”Maybelle the Cockroach” on Wednesday, April 11 at 4 pm EDT

View a recording here. 

Mary Carole Strother will share her 2011 ISTE Technology Innovation Award winning wiki, “Maybelle the Cockroach.” This collaborative project combines Glogster EDU with other Web 2.0 tools like Blabberize, VoiceThread, Mixbook, QR codes, Animoto, Vokis, and Photobabble. Get inspiration for your own digital learning adventure!

Meet Maybelle the Cockroach: http://maybellethecockroach.wikispaces.com

Read about Maybelle in Coverge Magazine:
http://www.convergemag.com/classtech/Maybelle-the-Cockroach-Sparks-Digital-Learning-Adventures.html

3. Navigate Our Digital World Through Glogster EDU Eyes & Make Connections to CCSS (Common Core State Standards) on Thursday, April 19 at 4 pm

View a recording here. 

Hosted by Andrea Gardner, Instructional Technology Specialist at Westford Public School in Westford, MA.

According to their mission statement, the Common Core State Standards “provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them. The standards are designed to be robust and relevant to the real world, reflecting the knowledge and skills that our young people need for success in college and careers. With American students fully prepared for the future, our communities will be best positioned to compete successfully in the global economy.”

During this Webinar, we will:

•Understand how technology is part of the Common Core Standards
•Identify specific examples of where technology is located within the CCSS
•Share what that looks like through Glogster EDU eyes
•Review and discuss technology, multimedia and the 4Cs
•Present possible options for moving forward with integrating technology into the classroom

4. Glogster EDU in Higher Education on Tuesday, April 24 at 7 pm EDT

Registration closed.

Hosted by Dr. Torria Bond, Instructional Designer at California Baptist University.

Ideas will be presented for using Glogster EDU to enhance your face-to-face and blended courses; and to build community in your fully online courses. Learn creative and pedagogically sound ways to engage your learners.

View a calendar of all Webinars and events

Hope you can make it!

In the words of a Glogster EDU flipper…

Today, I’ll let Glogster EDU Ambassador Lisa Salyer tell you in her in her own words how she uses Glogster EDU for flipped teaching. Take it away, Lisa!
When I discovered Glogster EDU,  I was struggling with how to incorporate meaningful higher level activities and project- based learning methods into my classroom.  Most educational software is limited to rote practice and memorization.  Glogster EDU is the only platform that I have found that allows for organization of teacher lessons, student projects, etc.
Glogster EDU is the absolute perfect platform for the flipped approach.  I think it is so important to demonstrate how you can create Glogs to meet diverse learning styles.  When possible I try to include a story, song, poetry, quotes, instructional podcasts, interactive practice, and enrichment through student creation of Glogs.

Oh! The Place You’ll Go

I strive to design my own Glogs so that students who are absent can access the Glog and make up the lesson at home.  My goal in creating Glogs vary; however, my instructional Glogs aim to set purpose, provide review, instruct, and provide guided/independent practice.  I am also able to extend and remediate through Glogs.
As for preparing, recording and assembling,  a teacher must be motivated to do this during evenings and weekends.  With that being said, once you establish your core then enriching and making changes is easily done!  I try to find podcasts that already meet my instructional needs — no need to reinvent the wheel, plus pre-made podcasts save me a huge amount of time. (Click on the Glog thumbnails for examples.)

Night Letters (click on the Voki!

 On those days when I become a facilitator in my class, I feel a great since of accomplishment. My students are all exploring and learning, and I am monitoring, correcting misconceptions, or challenging students to extend their learning.  Some of the proudest moments I have are when  students self-inititate Glogs on topics of interest to them and learn through their own research!
Lisa has generously provided a few of her own Glog presentations:

Language Arts Glogs 

Math Glogs

Famous Americans Glog Project

Student Podcasts <— If you’re only going to click on one link, make it this one! So great.
Thanks so much, Lisa. I’m inspired; are you?

What about younger learners? Flipped classrooms vs. flipped teaching

Today I attended a fantastic webinar titled The Art of a Flipped Classroom – Turning Learning on its Head, hosted by Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams, pioneers of the flipped movement. They brought up a question that comes up often in flipped discussions: How do primary school teachers flip their classrooms? Younger learners may not be equipped with the technological skills, self direction, or parental guidance required to learn material independently at home.
Jon Bergmann responded by making a distinction between a flipped classroom and the idea of flipped teaching as a general approach. It’s not necessary to flip every class every day! The question to ask yourself, he says, is simple: What is the best use of your class time? Focus on the answer to that question, and then see if you can shift anything not included in that answer outside your class time. Even if you flip just a few classes or units, if you’re making better use of your time together –interacting more, providing more opportunities for collaboration– then students will feel the positive effects.
Glogster EDU Ambassador Meghan Gagne teaches 3rd grade. While her students are not ready for a true flipped classroom, she incorporates flipped teaching by providing her students with Glogs to review at home.

 I use Glogs to  present a review of difficult concepts and pose extra credit assignments. I find it to be a very engaging way to give extra help when my kids need it most — when they are tackling homework without me. 
Do you think the flipped approach can be adapted to younger learners? How do you incorporate flipped teaching into your primary classrooms? Do tell!

Standardized test prep? Flip it!

Today, Glogster EDU Ambassador Robin Keating shares how she uses the flipped classroom approach to prepare her students for standardized tests.

I have been using Glogster EDU for my flipped classroom often this year.  Presently we are in a review period for our state test, the STAAR.  For each unit, the students view a Glog to review videos and songs, play games, and read notes.  I also include a mystery person for them to identify as an accountability piece.

They have two days to review the Glog material.  On the third day, I assign an in-class project for students to complete based on what they reviewed on the Glog.  With this approach, I don’t have to do whole group instruction; I can plan activities that review the necessary skills while I pull small groups off to the side for more personal attention.   I post all the Glogs on my Wikispace so my students can access them easily.

I love the idea to include a “mystery person” to hold students accountable for reviewing the Glogs. (Hiding Justin Beieber behind an image of a present? Genius!) Robin turns a potentially snore-inducing task like standardized test prep into a fun, hands-on activity that students can move through at their own pace.

Do you incorporate flipped methods into your test prep? Can you think of other ways to make test prep more engaging?

Tomorrow, Glogster EDU Ambassadors will show how they adapt flipped classroom strategies to younger learners. Stay tuned!

Flipping the science classroom

Welcome to flipped week! We canvassed Glogster EDU Ambassadors to see how they are incorporating the flipped classroom approach in their teaching practice, and this week we’re sharing their techniques with you. Today, Cindy Willits, 5th grade teacher at PA Virtual Charter School, describes how she uses Glogster EDU in her science curriculum.

I do science labs with my students online, record the Elluminate (BB Collaborate) session, and put the link to the recording on the Glog. I also use videos of the entire lab broken down and attach lab sheets, etc. on the Glog to offer students the chance to do the lab on their own at home.  These Glogs also serve as a resource for next year!  

Here is my favorite Glog utilizing this approach for science:  

Be sure to click on the Elluminate session link in Cindy’s Glog above. The energy and enthusiasm she brings to her virtual lab is so inspiring!

Those who work in non-virtual schools could provide a video Glog as pre-lab work for students to watch at home, so that they come to class the next day ready to jump right in. Or Glogs could serve as guides for at-home labs, as enrichment activities or extra credit.

What do you think about this flipped approach to science labs? Have you incorporated similar strategies in your own classroom? Please share!

Using Glogster EDU to make the flip

Much has been said (and debated) about the “flipped classroom,”  a pedagogical model in which the traditional classroom structure — lecture in class, homework at home — is “flipped.” Students watch or listen to prerecorded material at home, and engage in collaborative exercises, discussions, and projects  in class. (If you’re not familiar with the idea, this is a good overview.) 

The concept is simple, but in practice, an effective flipped model requires a great deal of preparation upfront. Fortunately, with Khan Academy quickly becoming a household name and the launch of Youtube for Schools, teachers now have access to tens of thousands of quality recordings to help them “make the flip” without necessarily creating all of the instructional material themselves. The question then becomes one of delivery — how to make those resources easily accessible to students and motivating enough so that students actually do the necessary preparations at home.

We hope that Glogster EDU provides you with the answer. It’s quick and easy  to embed instructional videos in a Glog, which students can view from home or wherever they have internet access. The creative format is completely customizable and visually engaging for students. You can embed a podcast in your Glog, link to online resources, or use the data attachment tool (with Glogster EDU Premium) to attach a short quiz to check for comprehension. Students can leave their questions in the Glog comments, so you know exactly what to focus on in class the next day.

There are pros and cons to the flipped classroom, of course (as with any learning model, once size never fits all), but the basic philosophy is one I think we can all get behind: students taking control of their own learning. When class time is reserved for active learning rather than passive note-taking, students get the opportunity to collaborate with their peers and engage with the material in a hands-on way that will lead to authentic, meaningful learning.

Or that’s the goal, anyway. This is where you come into the discussion! Glogster EDUcators, we want to hear from you. Are you a proponent of the flipped model? How do you put it into practice? Do you use Glogster EDU to make the flip, and if so, how?

We’ve asked a few of our Glogster EDU Ambassadors these questions, and next week I’ll be sharing their stories, resources, and sample Glogs. I’d love to include your stories, too — feel free to leave your thoughts in the comments.

Stay tuned!

Image from David Truss’s “3 Keys to a Flipped Classroom.” 

Make your textbook interactive with Glogster EDU

Guest post by Glogster EDU Ambassador Rositsa Mineva, a primary English Language Teacher from Stara Zagora, Bulgaria.

In Bulgaria, students start learning English at the age of 8, starting with basic speaking, reading, comprehensive listening, and writing.

When students are this age, they aren’t required to actually write vocabulary. Instead, students memorize words through repetition of new vocabulary, sentences, texts etc. Students need audio and visual aids as much as possible to help them with the learning process.

For a long time, I’ve been brainstorming some ideas on how to facilitate the self training of my students so they can continue to learn, both in and out of the classroom. I discovered that the best way to do this is by supplying them with more audio and visual aids to use at home and in the classroom. From this observation, the idea for a virtual classroom and interactive textbook was born.

Glogster EDU has helped a lot with both. On Glogster EDU, I made my virtual classroom with students. Using the variety of tools on the site,  I could make my textbooks interactive and share them with my students and colleagues (example 1), (example 2).

Making my textbook interactive was quite simple: I needed only to scan the pages of my real textbook as pictures (png, jpeg files), find audio files of my English lessons as mp3 files, find some interesting links in a connection with the topic and main aims of the lesson I was making interactive, and put them together on one page.

See the Glog below for an example.

It’s a fast, easy and fun activity which takes no more than 15 minutes to create. I compiled all units on a contest page.

I also put the link to my interactive textbook on the class wiki and connected it to my Skype information and the school website.

My students can no use their interactive textbook freely at home and listen to lessons and do exercises online. This improves my students’ reading and listening skills and makes learning more fun and engaging. It helps not only  students but parents as well.

Learn more about my internet classroom here.

 

My Internet Classroom

Guest post by Glogster EDU Ambassador Rositsa Mineva, a primary English Language Teacher from Stara Zagora, Bulgaria

To make learning accessible both at home and in school, I created an “internet classroom” for my students using Glogster EDU and a classroom wiki.

While my students are home, I can connect with them through Skype, which is an easy and fast way for me to give directions as well as get student feedback. If I want to communicate with my students outside of the classroom, I give them a link through Skype. They can use internet resources (e-textbookse- tests, online exercises, projects, and other forms of project-based learning on different topics) freely from home. This improves students’ language and time management skills.

Example of a Test Preparation Glog

With Glogster EDU, students have the opportunity to interact in a safe, digital environment. With their student accounts, they can create Glog presentations or simply Glog about a  topic that interests them.

Project-based learning is accessible and fun for students on the site.  This kind of learning fosters teamwork, keeps students engaged in course content, and makes teaching and learning more fun.

This type of activity leads to the development of key skills which real 21st century students need: critical thinking, collaboration, presentation, and digital literacy skills.

Creating a digital learning environment with Glogster EDU, communicating with my students on Skype, and collaborating with them on a class wiki facilitates positive student-teacher relationships and allows both to explore Web 2.0 and learning concepts together.

Here are the resources I use in my online classroom:

My Glogster EDU profile

My class wiki 

E-textbooks 

E-tests 

Online exercises 

Glog projects 

Project-based learning

Glog presentations

Web 2.0 resources wiki

Bridge Learning from Home to School: Create an IT classroom with wiki, Skype, and Glogster

My Internet Classroom Glog

Student-led Glogster EDU Tutorials

Click to view!
Click here to view!
Glogster EDU Ambassador Kristina Holzweiss showed us these Glogster EDU video tutorials led by one of her students, Jessie.

Let Jessie take you and your students through all the steps involved in making a Glog, from logging in to saving your work. Isn’t she great?

You can get in touch with Kristina through her website or Edmodo group #siutd6.

Thanks, Kristina and Jessie!

School Spotlight: New Milford High

Mrs. Keesing, the Library Media Specialist at New Milford High School in New Milford, NJ,  collaborated with World History teacher Ms. Perna on a Glogster EDU project designed to engage 9th grade students in their Monarchs of Europe unit.

As the students were finishing their unit, Mrs. Keesing provided them with their login information and basic instructions for using Glogster EDU.  Students chose one of the monarchs they studied to highlight in their Glogs.  Among the elements to include were the following: name of monarch and monarchy; image of monarch; description of monarch’s residence; monarch’s proudest achievement; and a comparison illustrating the superiority of the chosen monarch over a rival monarch.  Some students embedded a video clip to enhance their project.

Here are a few of the final projects. Click on the image to view the full size Glog.

Louis XIV of France

Louis XIV: The Sun King

Maria Theresa

Louis XIV

Louis XIV

Pretty snazzy, eh? Thank you to Mrs. Keesing, Ms. Perna, and principal Eric Sheninger for showing us how New Milford uses Glogster EDU.

How does your school use Glogster EDU? If you’ve got a great lesson plan idea or just want to show off your students’ masterpieces, we’ll feature you in the next “School Spotlight.” Let us know in the comments!