About adaptivelearnin

I am an educational professional who is passionate about needs analysis and materials creation to enhance student learning of all ages. I hope the content I share here will be of value to you in some way. Opinions are my own and are not those of my employer. Join me at my session for the 2013 TESOL International Conference, "ESL Instruction: Developing Your Skills to Become a Master Conductor", March 21 10:00 AM in room C144. My presentation focuses on listening, speaking and pronunciation music teaching techniques incorporated with ESL teaching. This is not your typical music/ESL presentation with chants and songs. Be prepared to use your vocal chords, diaphragm, lungs, mouth muscles, and arms like you have never used before in pronunciation, speaking and language instruction. Learn how to use music conducting skills in the language classroom to better facilitate language acquisition. Learn how to use music performance skills (vocal and instrumental) to better facilitate language learning. Be prepared to laugh and have fun. I look forward to meeting you and working with you.

Anxiety-Free Writing: Five Minute Friday and Glogging

It was a dark and stormy night. Pascal awoke with a start to the sound of knocking upon the door. "I have a bad feeling about this," the muttered to herself.

It was a dark and stormy night. Pascal awoke with a start to the sound of knocking upon the door. “I have a bad feeling about this,” the muttered to herself.

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This is a Guest Post by Adaptive Learnin’. If you are interested in submitting a guest post, you can contact us on Twitter @GlogsterEdu, or comment with your Email Address below (email addresses will not appear publicly). 

A Discovery I Made Recently

On my blog adaptivelearnin, I just started participating in this fantastic free writing idea that only takes five minutes every Friday, called Five Minute Friday.  The idea is to write freely for five minutes without distractions, without worry, and without focus on any of technical aspects of the writing process.  If you mess up, you don’t stop.  Poor spelling? no worries. If you make grammatical mistakes, no problem. You keep going, unleashing a flood of ideas into your writing.  The purpose is to be free from all the worries that normally cause writing anxiety or “writer’s block.” 

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Use Pinterest to Find Public Domain Images to Rock Your Glogs

Finding websites that have public domain images to use in your Glogs can be a time-consuming task. Searching for hours on Google or other search engines for websites that have images that are public domain and royalty free can be daunting. I have found that a quicker way to find public domain images is through searching Pinterest.

Searching “public domain” in the search window on Pinterest allows you to quickly find images that have been categorized or tagged as such.  While this will lead you to images that have been listed as public domain, doing so doesn’t assure that the images are definitely public domain. You need to click on the image and be redirected to the original website to double-check that the image is actually a public domain image (as well as to be able to save the image to your computer.)

Searching public domain images on Pinterest can save hours of time because many of the images have already been categorized or tagged as public domain.  Therefore, the accuracy of finding a website that has public domain images is much higher than searching images through search engines.  Once you have found one website that has a public domain image, there is a higher likelihood that the website has other public domain images as well, which can be used on your Glogs.

Here’s how to search Pinterest for public domain images, how to save the images, and how to upload them to your Glog.

First- Log-in to Pinterest.

Second- In the search window type in “public domain”.

Third- Scroll through the images and find the image that you would like to use as your Glog wall.

Fourth- Click one time on the image you would like to use.

Fifth- Click on the large image to be redirected to the original source of the public domain image. 

Sixth-  Check the original source to make sure the image is definitely public domain.

Seventh- Review the instructions to download and “save” the image to your computer.  

Eighth-  Once you are on the original public domain image, right click and “save image as”.

Ninth- Chose the location you would like to save the image to.

Tenth- Go to your Glog and click on “Wall”.  Next click on “Glog Wall”.  Then click “Upload”.

Eleventh- Find the image you would like to upload and double-click on it.

Twelfth- Click on the setting for how you would like to use the image as your Glog Wall.  Then click “Use It”. 

Thirteeth- Make sure you chose the correct option you wanted for how to display the image as your Glog Wall.

Fourteenth- Next set the image for your Page Wall.  You can use a public domain image or use one of the images that Glogster EDU provides.

Fifteenth- Use Pinterest to find other images to place inside your Glog.  Follow the same search instructions as listed above.

Sixteenth- Click to the original source to make sure it is definitely public domain.  Save it and upload it to your Glog using “Images” on Glogster EDU.

Seventeenth- Finish your Glog and voilà.   

Glog by Beth Crumpler

Top 10 Glogs for Professional Development

Guest post by Beth Crumpler from Adaptive Learnin. (If you are interested in guest posting, please contact Jennifer at jennifer.wineke@glogster.com.)

A tag cloud (a typical Web 2.0 phenomenon in i...

Image via Wikipedia

I have written several posts about Glogster EDU on my own blog, so I am  thrilled to be asked to contribute as a guest blogger. After brainstorming for a while and searching through Glogster EDU’s website for writing ideas, I came across some fabulous Glogs that contain web tech tools for teachers. I was so inspired by the resources that these Glogs contain that I decided it would be a great subject for my first guest blog contribution. I found many Web 2.0 websites for teaching and learning that I have never heard of, and some that I have heard of but never have used.

Glogster EDU is often promoted as a tool for students to create Glogs, or interactive posters, for assignments or projects. The following top 10 Glogs show how Glogster EDU can also be used by educators to create interactive posters for professional development. Glogs can be created for many purposes, and these 10 Glogs show off a few of the infinite possibilities as well as offer great learning experiences for teachers. I found these Glogs in the public technology categories section of Glogster EDU.

Here are my Top 10 Glogs for professional development resources: 

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